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Chemistry


\Rightarrow វចនានុក្រមគឺមីវិទ្យា (អង់គ្លេស) (*.PDF)

\Rightarrow បច្ចេកទេសគឺមីវិទ្យាក្នុងការធ្វើទឹកផ្លែឈើ

\Rightarrow គឺមីវិទ្យាពិសេស៖ អាតូម, ម៉ូលេគុល, ល្បាយ(សមាសធាតុ)

\Rightarrow ទ្រឹស្តីមេកានិចកង់ទិច អនុវត្ត៍ក្នុងគឺមីវិទ្យា និងគីមី-រូប​

(ទ្រឹស្តីកង់តូម)

    \Rightarrow មូលដ្ឋានគ្រឹះគីមីវិទ្យា | Fundamental of Chemistry

    \Rightarrow ជីវគឺមី | Biochemistry

    \Rightarrow ADN – ARN – Protein

    \Rightarrow គីមីសរីរាង្គ | Organic Chemistry

    • Part 01 (ទាញយក | download)
    • Part 02 (ទាញយក | download)
    • Part 03 (ទាញយក | download)
    • Part 04 (ទាញយក | download)
    • មាតិកាសៀវភៅ | Book’s Contents

      Chapter 0
      Students Guide to Succcess in Organic Chemistry
      0.1 What is Organic Chemistry? 4
      0.2 Organic Chemistry in the Everyday World 9
      0.3 Organic Chemists are People, Too 11
      0.4 Learning to Think Like a Chemist 14
      0.5 Developing Study Methods for Success 15
      Key Ideas from Chapter 0 18

      Chapter 1
      Atoms, Orbitals, and Bonds
      1.1 The Periodic Table 21
      1.2 Atomic Structure 22
      1.3 Energy Levels and Atomic Orbitals 23
      1.4 How Electrons Fill Orbitals 27
      1.5 Bond Formation 28
      1.6 Molecular Orbitals 30
      1.7 Orbital Hybridization 35
      1.8 Multiple Bonding 46
      1.9 Drawing Lewis Structures 49
      1.10 Polar Covalent Bonds 54
      1.11 Inductive Effects on Bond Polarity 57
      1.12 Formal Charges 58
      1.13 Resonance 60
      Key Ideas from Chapter 1 66

      Chapter 2
      Introduction to Organic Nomenclature and Functional Groups
      2.1 Drawing Organic Structures 73
      2.2 Alkanes 77
      2.3 Structural Isomerism 77
      2.4 IUPAC Nomenclature 79
      2.5 Naming Alkanes 80
      2.6 Naming Cycloalkanes 87
      2.7 Naming Complex Alkyl Groups 91
      2.8 Functional Groups 97
      2.9 Naming Alkenes and Alkynes 100
      2.10 Naming Alkenes, Part II 108
      2.11 Arenes 109
      2.12 Organohalogens 113
      2.13 Using Molecular Formulas 115
      Key Ideas from Chapter 2 117

      Chapter 3
      Molecular Conformations
      3.1 Representing Three-Dimensional Molecules in Two
      Dimensions 125
      3.2 Dihedral Angles 127
      3.3 The Conformations of Ethane 129
      3.4 Conformational Analysis of Butane 131
      3.5 Angle Strain in Cycloalkanes 134
      3.6 Conformations of Cyclohexane 136
      3.7 Conformational Inversion of Cyclohexane 142
      3.8 Conformational Analysis of Monosubstituted
      Cyclohexanes 143
      3.9 Naming Stereoisomers 147
      3.10 Conformational Analysis of Disubstituted
      Cyclohexanes 149
      Special Topic – Computer Modeling 155
      3.11 Conformations of Other Cycloalkanes 157
      3.12 Naming Polycyclic Ring Systems 159
      3.13 Polycyclic Ring Systems 164
      Sidebar – Higher Polycyclic Structures 166
      Key Ideas from Chapter 3 168

      Chapter 4
      Physical Properties
      of Organic Compounds
      4.1 Phases of Matter 175
      Sidebar – Liquid Crystals 178
      4.2 Melting Points 179
      4.3 Boiling Points 183
      4.4 Solubility 190
      Sidebar – Surfactants 194
      4.5 Density 197
      Key Ideas from Chapter 4 199

      Chapter 5
      Acid-Base Theory
      5.1 Acids and Bases 209
      5.2 Acid and Base Strength 215
      5.3 Hard and Soft Acids and Bases 222
      5.4 Organic Acids and Bases 226
      5.5 Relative Acidity and Basicity 231
      5.6 Substituent Effects on Acidity and Basicity 235
      Key Ideas from Chapter 5 238

      Chapter 6
      Reaction Mechanisms
      An Overview of Organic Chemistry
      6.1 Chemical Equilibria and Rates 246
      6.2 Equilibrium Thermodynamics 250
      6.3 Reaction Kinetics 253
      6.4 Reaction Profiles and Mechanisms 255
      6.5 Why Reactions Occur 260
      6.6 Organic Reaction Terminology 264
      6.7 Classification of Reagents in Organic Reactions 270
      6.8 Writing Reaction Mechanisms 270
      6.9 Substitution Reactions 278
      6.10 Addition Reactions 281
      6.11 Elimination Reactions 284
      Key Ideas from Chapter 6 287

      Chapter 7
      Nucleophilic Additions to the Carbonyl Group
      7.1 Naming Carbon—Oxygen Double Bonds 299
      7.2 Reactivity of the Carbonyl Group 304
      7.3 Guide for Learning Organic Reactions 307
      7.4 The Cyanohydrin Reaction 309
      7.5 Addition of Water and Alcohols 311
      7.6 Reaction with Nitrogen Nucleophiles 320
      Sidebar – Biochemical Transamination 325
      7.7 Reaction with Hydride Nucleophiles 326
      7.8 Carbon Nucleophiles 331
      Synthesis of Triphenylmethanol 336
      7.9 Organic Synthesis 339
      7.10 The Wittig Reaction 342
      Synthesis of Methylene-4-tert-butylcyclohexane 344
      Key Ideas from Chapter 7 348

      Chapter 8-A
      Reaction Summary I
      A summary of the reactions learned in Chapters 7-8

      Chapter 8
      Nucleophilic Substitution on the Carbonyl
      Group
      8.1 The Acyl Transfer Mechanism 360
      8.2 Water and Alcohol Nucleophiles 362
      Synthesis of Isoamyl Acetate (Banana Oil) 366
      8.3 Halide and Carboxylic Acid Nucleophiles 372
      Sidebar – Aspirin and Acetaminophen 376
      8.4 Reaction with Nitrogen Nucleophiles 381
      8.5 Reaction with the Hydride Nucleophile 384
      8.6 Carbon Nucleophiles 392
      8.7 Nitriles 401
      8.8 The Baeyer-Villiger Oxidation 406
      Synthesis of Caprolactone 409
      8.9 Solving Mechanistic Problems 410
      Key Ideas from Chapter 8 414

      Chapter 9
      Infrared Spectroscopy
      and
      Mass Spectrometry
      9.1 Electromagnetic Radiation and Spectroscopy 431
      9.2 Molecular Vibrations in Infrared Spectroscopy 434
      9.3 Introduction to Interpreting Infrared Spectra 436
      9.4 Hydrogen Bonded to sp3 Hybrid Atoms 439
      9.5 Hydrogen Bonded to sp2 and sp Hybrid Atoms 443
      9.6 Carbon—Heteroatom Bonds 448
      9.7 Other Bonds 452
      9.8 Interpreting Infrared Spectra, Part 2 456
      9.9 Mass Spectrometry 459
      9.10 The Molecular Ion 463
      Key Ideas from Chapter 9 467

      Chapter 10
      Nuclear Magnetic Resonance
      10.1 Theory of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 475
      10.2 Shielding 478
      10.3 Chemical Shift and Molecular Structure 480
      10.4 Interpreting Proton NMR Spectra 484
      10.5 Spin-Spin Splitting 491
      10.6 Integration Signals in an NMR Spectrum 501
      10.7 Analyzing an NMR Spectrum 503
      Sidebar – Magnetic Resonance Imaging 511
      10.8 Strategy for Solving Spectral Problems 513
      Key Ideas from Chapter 10 519

      Chirality
      11.1 Symmetry and Asymmetry 532
      11.2 Nomenclature of Stereocenters 538
      11.3 Properties of Asymmetric Molecules 544
      Sidebar – Chiral Recognition 544
      11.4 Optical Isomerism 546
      11.5 Fisher Projections 549
      11.6 Molecules with Two Stereocenters 553
      11.7 Resolution of Enantiomers 558
      11.8 Stereocenters Other than Carbon 561
      Key Ideas from Chapter 11 564

      Chapter 12
      Aliphatic Nucleophilic Substitution
      12.1 Naming Single Bonded Heteroatom Functional
      Groups 579
      12.2 Comparing Nucleophilic Substitution Reaction
      Mechanisms 586
      12.3 The SN1 and SN2 Reaction Mechanisms 588
      12.4 Stereochemistry of Nucleophilic Substitutions 592
      12.5 The Substrate 595
      12.6 Nucleophiles and Leaving Groups 601
      12.7 Common Nucleophiles 606
      12.8 The Reaction Medium 607
      12.9 SN1 versus SN2 613
      12.10 Halide Nucleophiles 613
      Synthesis of 1-Bromobutane 616
      12.11 Oxygen Nucleophiles 620
      12.12 Nitrogen Nucleophiles 625
      Synthesis of 2,5-Diaminoadipic Acid 628
      12.13 Carbon Nucleophiles 631
      12.14 Neighboring Group Participation 634
      Special Topic – SN1 vs. SN2 637
      Key Ideas from Chapter 12 641

      Chapter 13
      Elimination Reactions
      13.1 The Elimination Mechanisms 658
      13.2 Stereochemistry of Eliminations 660
      13.3 Direction of Elimination 663
      13.4 E1 vs. E2 670
      13.5 Elimination vs. Substitution 671
      13.6 Summary of Elimination and Substitution 673
      13.7 E & Z Nomenclature 677
      13.8 Elimination of Organohalogens 678
      13.9 Dehydration of Alcohols 682
      Synthesis of Cyclohexene 685
      13.10 Pinacol Rearrangement 686
      13.11 Hofmann Elimination 691
      13.12 Oxidation of Alcohols 694
      Synthesis of Citronellal 697
      Key Ideas from Chapter 13 698

      Chapter 14
      Electrophilic Addition to
      Unsaturated Carbons
      14.1 Addition Reaction Mechanisms 713
      14.2 Direction and Stereochemistry of Addition
      Reactions 715
      14.3 Addition of Hydrogen Halides 718
      14.4 Addition of Water and Alcohols 722
      14.5 Hydroboration-Oxidation 726
      Synthesis of (-)-Isopinocampheol 730
      14.6 Electrophilic Addition of Halogens 732
      14.7 Addition of Hydrogen 736
      14.8 Dihydroxylation Reactions 742
      14.9 Addition of Carbenes 745
      Synthesis of 7,7-Dichlorobicyclo[4.1.0]heptane 749
      14.10 Oxidation of Alkenes 750
      Key Ideas from Chapter 14 754

      Chapter 15
      Organic Synthesis
      15.1 Synthesis Design and Strategy 771
      15.2 Principles of Retrosynthetic Analysis 774
      15.3 Protecting Groups 778
      Synthesis of the Ethylene Glycol Acetal of
      Cyclohexanone 781
      15.4 Lithium Dialkylcuprate Reagents 781
      Synthesis of trans-Stilbene 784
      15.5 A Synthetic Example 786
      15.6 Synthesis of Difunctional Compounds 790
      Key Ideas from Chapter 15 795

      Chapter 16
      Conjugation and Resonance
      16.1 Naming Compounds with Multiple Functional
      Groups 812
      16.2 Conjugated Dienes 816
      16.3 The Allyl Group and Resonance 823
      16.4 Conjugate Addition Reactions 826
      Special Topic – Ultraviolet Spectroscopy 829
      16.5 Double Bonds Conjugated With Carbonyl
      Groups 832
      Sidebar – The Chemistry of Vision 834
      16.6 The Diels-Alder Reaction 837
      Synthesis of cis-Norbornene-5,6-endo-dicarboxylic
      Anhydride 841
      16.7 Orbital Symmetry and the Diels-Alder
      Reaction 844
      16.8 Synthesis with the Diels-Alder Reaction 847
      Key Ideas from Chapter 16 852

      Chapter 17
      Aromaticity
      17.1 Benzene 868
      Sidebar – Diamond, Graphite, and Buckyballs 872
      17.2 The Stability of Benzene 874
      17.3 Molecular Orbitals in Benzene 876
      17.4 The Molecular Orbitals of Cyclobutadiene 879
      17.5 Aromaticity 880
      17.6 Hückel’s Rule 882
      17.7 Aromatic Ions 887
      17.8 Naming Benzene Derivatives 891
      17.9 Aromatic Heterocyclic Compounds 895
      17.10 Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons 898
      17.11 The Benzyl Group 900
      Key Ideas from Chapter 17 901

      Chapter 18
      Aromatic Substitution Reactions
      18.1 Mechanism of Aromatic Electrophilic Substitution 914
      18.2 The Nitration of Benzene 917
      18.3 Halogenation and Sulfonation of Benzene 920
      18.4 Friedel-Crafts Alkylation and Acylation 924
      18.5 Effects of Monosubstituted Arenes on Substitution 928
      18.6 Rate Effects with Monosubstituted Arenes 932
      18.7 Classification of Substituents 935
      18.8 Friedel-Crafts Acylation 943
      Synthesis of o-Benzoylbenzoic Acid 947
      18.9 Multiple Substituent Effects 948
      18.10 Substitution on Polycyclic Arenes 951
      18.11 Diazotization 954
      Synthesis of Methyl Orange 957
      Sidebar – Sulfa Drugs 958
      18.12 Other Diazonium Salt Reactions 961
      18.13 Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution 963
      18.14 Benzyne 965
      Synthesis of Trypticene 968
      18.15 Synthesis Examples 969
      Key Ideas from Chapter 18 975

      Chapter 19
      a Substitution on Carbonyl Compounds
      19.1 Keto-Enol Tautomerism 997
      19.2 Enols and Enolate Ions 999
      19.3 The Mechanism of a Substitution 1002
      19.4 a Halogenations 1003
      Synthesis of 2-Bromocholestanone 1005
      19.5 Alkylation of Enolate Ions 1009
      19.6 Stabilized Enolate Ions 1012
      Sidebar – Barbiturates 1020
      19.7 Enamine Reaction 1023
      Synthesis of 2-Acetylcyclohexanone 1026
      19.8 Silyl Enol Ethers 1027
      19.9 1,3-Dithianes 1030
      Key Ideas from Chapter 19 1033

      Chapter 20
      Carbonyl Condensation Reactions
      20.1 The Carbonyl Condensation Mechanism 1052
      20.2 Carbonyl Condensation Vs a Substitution 1054
      Sidebar – Borodin and Aldehydes 1056
      20.3 Mixed Aldol Condensations 1057
      20.4 Intramolecular Aldol Condensations 1061
      Synthesis of 1,5-Diphenyl-1,4-pentadien-3-one 1063
      20.5 The Claisen Condensation 1064
      Sidebar – Biochemical Carbonyl Condensation Reactions 1067
      20.6 The Dieckmann Cyclization 1071
      20.7 The Michael Addition Reaction 1072
      20.8 The Robinson Annulation Reaction 1076
      Synthesis of 4,4-Dimethyl-2-cyclohexen-2-one 1079
      20.9 Carbonyl Condensations in Synthesis 1080
      Key Ideas from Chapter 20 1084

      Chapter 21
      Radical Reactions
      21.1 Radical Structure and Stability 1093
      21.2 Halogenation of Alkanes 1095
      Sidebar – Atmospheric Ozone Depletion 1099
      21.3 Allylic Bromination 1102
      21.4 Benzylic Bromination 1105
      Synthesis of 1-Bromo-1-phenylethane 1106
      21.5 Radical Addition to Alkenes 1107
      21.6 Radical Oxidations 1112
      21.7 Radical Reductions 1115
      Synthesis of 1-Methoxy-1,4-cyclohexadiene 1121
      Special Topic – Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy 1122
      Key Ideas from Chapter 21 1125

      Chapter 22
      Polymer Chemistry
      22.1 Structural Characteristics of Polymers 1138
      22.2 Polymer Nomenclature 1141
      22.3 Types of Polymerization Reactions 1144
      22.4 Chain-Growth Polymerization 1146
      Synthesis of Poly(vinyl acetate) 1155
      Sidebar – Natural Rubber 1155
      22.5 Controlling Stereochemistry in Vinyl Polymers 1157
      22.6 Nonvinyl Chain-Growth Polymerization 1160
      22.7 Step-Growth Polymerization 1163
      Synthesis of Poly(ethylene terephthalate) 1165
      Sidebar – Plastic Recycling 1167
      22.8 Copolymers 1169
      Sidebar – Plasticizers 1172
      22.9 Cross-Linked Polymers 1173
      Key Ideas from Chapter 22 1178

      Chapter 24
      Carbohydrates
      24.1 Classification of Carbohydrates 1250
      24.2 Monosaccharides 1253
      24.3 Cyclic Forms of Monosaccharides 1256
      Sidebar – The Sweet Taste 1260
      24.4 Reactions of Monosaccharides 1263
      24.5 Oxidation and Reduction Reactions 1265
      24.6 Changing the Chain Length 1268
      24.7 Fischer Proof of Glucose Structure 1271
      24.8 Glycolysis – I 1275
      24.9 Glycolysis – II 1280
      Sidebar – Arsenic Poisoning 1285
      24.10 Glycoside Formation 1286
      24.11 Disaccharides 1291
      24.12 Polysaccharides 1291
      Key Ideas from Chapter 24 1294

      Chapter 25
      Nucleic Acids
      25.1 Nucleosides and Nucleotides 1306
      25.2 Laboratory Synthesis of Nucleotides and Nucleosides 1310
      25.3 Nucleic Acids 1314
      25.4 Replication of DNA 1317
      Sidebar – The Polymerase Chain Reaction 1321
      25.5 Structure and Biosynthesis of RNA 1325
      25.6 RNA and Peptide Biosynthesis 1328
      25.7 Sequencing of DNA 1332
      25.8 Laboratory Nucleic Acid Synthesis 1337
      Sidebar – Self Replicating Organic Compounds 1343
      Key Ideas from Chapter 25 1345

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    12 Responses

    1. A good

      Like

    2. អត់មានសៀវភៅជាភាសាខ្មែរទេអីបង?

      Like

    3. i can’t download why??

      Liked by 1 person

    4. To chae kimoaeng

      Like

    5. To bopha

      Like

    6. i need document write in khmer letter

      Like

      • yeah! to tell u the the truth, there are little Chemistry document in our language, but i’ll ask my fri for help, if i got it, i’ll upload and share it here!! 🙂

        Like

    7. i need chemistry Unit for student in University.

      Like

    8. Good Article

      Like

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